'Candy' ride

Thanks to ride leader Daria Hopkins for a fantastic experience and this write-up!

Twenty-five cyclists gathered at Whole Foods for June ‘s Candy ride, which fell on a beautiful sunny day.

Our first stop at Rocket Fizz began with a brief introduction by the store’s friendly owner, Lindsay, who allowed for us to indulge in complimentary salt water taffy samples. We were also able to explore the store’s diverse soda collection, consisting of over 600 types of soda imported from hundreds of microbreweries throughout the world!

The group then ventured over to German Village to visit Schmidt’s Fudge Haus. Their friendly chocolate maker, Nathaniel, provided us with a demonstration regarding the chocolate making process (Insert 4). The chocolate and sweets at this store were so tasty that many of us had to be coaxed out of the store, as we went well past our allotted visit time.

Fudge demo! 

Fudge demo! 

The group then headed over to Northern Lights to visit Clown Cone and Confections. Our timing was perfect, as the store had just celebrated its 41st anniversary. The owner, Mark, whipped up one of the store’s well known specialties for us to see, the Clown Cone sundae. We were also able to see the store’s clown collection, which consists of approximately 875 clowns.

41 years of clown cones! 

41 years of clown cones! 

875 clowns?!?!!?!

875 clowns?!?!!?!

Mmmmmm.....

Mmmmmm.....

Oh yeah: MORE CANDY!

Oh yeah: MORE CANDY!

After many of us enjoyed a frozen treat at Clown Cone, the group returned to Whole Foods to socialize and recap the morning’s adventures.

Thanks to everyone who came out for the ride! See you next month!  

May 2017 activity report

ODOT transit employees learning to use the COTA bus racks during a Professional Development Ride with us this month.

ODOT transit employees learning to use the COTA bus racks during a Professional Development Ride with us this month.

Welcome to the monthly feature in which we round up all our events, earned media, program delivery, meetings and speaking engagements for the month. Representation and outreach like this is what you fund with your membership dollars and major gifts, folks! Behold, May:

All month

Delivered Columbus Bike Maps to bike shops throughout Central Ohio

May 1

Chaired the MORPC Community Advisory Committee meeting

May 2–3

Trained Bike Cleveland to deliver Professional Development rides

May 4

Columbus Alive: Things We Love: Picks from Emily Monnig

Vet the Bike the Cbus route

May 5 

Vet the June Year of Yay! route

May 6

Tabled at Pinchflat Bike Poster Blowout

May 9

Delivered a Professional Development Ride in Cleveland and another in Euclid

May 10

Meeting at the Ohio Department of Health regarding our upcoming Ride Buddy / How We Roll program for state employees

May 12

Met with a national representative from Dero

May 11

Tabled at the Worthington Community Bike Rodeo

Columbus Green Team meeting

May 13

Year of Yay!, 'April Showers Bring May Flowers' theme

May 15

Delivered a Professional Development Ride with ODOT transit professionals in Columbus

Yay Bikes! board meeting

May 16

nbc4i.com: "Groups aim to make biking to work safer and more convenient"

ODOT Messenger: "Bike to Work Week"

Led a bike ride with members of the press

Ride the Elevator

May 17

Columbus Ride of Silence

Participated in 2 Columbus Foundation Big Table conversations

May 19

The Loop: "5.19.17"

Led a ride to Columbus' Bike to Work Day celebration

May 21

Delivered a How We Roll ride for Yay Bikes! members

May 22

Delivered 2 Professional Development Rides in Defiance

May 23

Attended a planning meeting for the Statewide Active Transportation Institute

May 24

Attended a Central Ohio Greenways board meeting

May 30

Delivered a Professional Development Ride in Dublin

May 31

Delivered 2 Professional Development Rides in Meigs County (Pomeroy and Middleport

The sounds of silence

My son Alex and I, embarking on our homeward journey.

My son Alex and I, embarking on our homeward journey.

Never did it occur to me I could ride 263 miles in one weekend—at least, not until the century I recently completed with the help of friends. But over Memorial Day weekend, my son and I did it: Columbus > Parkersburg, WV > Columbus! What a fascinating turn in my bike life journey, with takeaways including:

Rolling hills are great fun. Wicking fabric in 3-hour rains save rides. Nature sucks (as do allergies). No thanks, gravel inclines! I love music! Birds are pretty rad, too. I CAN DO IT.

This last is a particularly Good Thing to know about oneself. I'm proud of all times I managed my discomfort to pedal one additional mile. I'm in awe of all the times I wanted to call for a pickup but didn't. I'm stronger than I thought I was.

But even more than that, was the silence. During much of the ride I did not talk, think (not even about work, which for anyone who knows me is...miraculous), distract myself with electronics: I was blank. So blank, in fact, that I began to understand what bird watchers are all about (which, for anyone who knows me, was NOT something that was ever gonna happen). It took a veeerrry long bike ride for me to reconnect with the stillness inside me. And what a gift that has been. 

When I began riding a bicycle—a poor quality, ill fitting bicycle—for transportation, more than a decade ago, I could not have guessed where it would take me (literally or figuratively). Certainly I never would have thought I'd actually enjoy all my daily short-mileage trips. And definitely not long-distance recreational riding. And absolutely not a 263 mile journey to Parkersburg and back.

Now I'm not saying that everyone should follow my path. If sewing or soccer or cooking is your path to transformation, rock on with your bad self. But I AM saying that if you've been thinking that biking just might be your thing—you're probably right, and I'm here for you. Yay Bikes! is here for you. Come on out for a ride! You'll not know where it will take you, but you can pretty much guarantee discovery, community, fun and adventure. None too shabby, eh?

Yay bikes! Yay you!

'April Showers, May Flowers' ride recap

The long boardwalk approaching Innis Park—part of the Alum Creek North greenway. Photo credit: Pete Heiss

The long boardwalk approaching Innis Park—part of the Alum Creek North greenway. Photo credit: Pete Heiss

Thanks to ride leader Gloria Hendricks for a fantastic experience and this write-up!

On May 13th, we had 45+ riders for the April Showers Bring May Flowers ride. The ride was 17 miles and took us out to Clintonville for Flowers and Bread, then back to Easton for Oberer's Flowers. This was my first time leading a Yay Bikes! ride and I was really nervous, but we had great weather and I was with great people. 

A Cooke Rd processional. Photo credit: Pete Heiss

A Cooke Rd processional. Photo credit: Pete Heiss

Flower and Bread is located on High st. and is very unique to Columbus. This shop serves flowers, bread, and coffee all in one, but that is not the best part. All of the flowers come from local flower nurseries on that day. You can also take arrangements classes there. Flower and Bread works with all local businesses for all of the products they use.

What a cute new place in Clintonville! Photo credit: Pete Heiss

What a cute new place in Clintonville! Photo credit: Pete Heiss

Yummy samples! Photo credit: Pete Heiss

Yummy samples! Photo credit: Pete Heiss

Hearing about flowers (or was it 'flour'??) and bread. Photo credit: Pete Heiss

Hearing about flowers (or was it 'flour'??) and bread. Photo credit: Pete Heiss

The last stop was Oberer's Flowers on Morse Crossing at Easton, a unique flower shop that allow customers to walk into the cooler and pick out their own flowers. This flower shop has a long history with Ohio—it has been family owned since 1890. They used to sell vegetables, and in 1922 they started selling flowers. Now they have six shops and four of them are in Ohio. The Easton store welcomed us with open arms during one of the busiest times of the year for them (Mother's Day weekend) and we are grateful.

Descending upon Oberer's. Photo credit: Pete Heiss

Descending upon Oberer's. Photo credit: Pete Heiss

Boom! Flowers! Photo credit: Pete Heiss

Boom! Flowers! Photo credit: Pete Heiss

After the ride we had a big surprise from Jeff Goves—donuts and cookies waiting for us at Whole Foods! Thanks, Jeff!

Donut-buying goof! Selfie courtesy Jeff Gove

Donut-buying goof! Selfie courtesy Jeff Gove

Thanks to everyone who came out for this ride. See you next month!

Life outside your car

The Ohio Department of Transportation and the Ohio Department of Health are unveiling their new active transportation campaign this month!

The Ohio Department of Transportation and the Ohio Department of Health are unveiling their new active transportation campaign this month!

People often share with me that they'd like to ride their bicycles for transportation...if not for X. And, to be fair, there are plenty of obstacles one might encounter when navigating a bike life from scratch on your own. So take a deep breath and start where you are. Ride to a festival or to grab coffee with friends. You don't have to give up your car today or start with a work commute. As lovely as it is to commute by bicycle to work—really, I can't recommend it highly enough—it's among the higher-stakes rides you could attempt out the gate. 

That said, if you're thinking of going for it, THIS IS YOUR MOMENT! May is National Bike Month, and that combined with several initiatives occurring locally means you'll be uniquely supported as you hit the streets this month: 

Yay Bikes! is heading up local coordination of the National Bike Challenge. Log your trips to encourage friendly competition within Central Ohio and throughout the country—and for a chance to win prizes, of course.

Yay Bikes! will be participating in two local Bike to Work Day events—the May 19 ride and the May 18 tabling event. Come say hi, and ride with us!

The Ohio Department of Transportation and Ohio Department of Health are launching their Statewide Active Transportation Plan "think outside your car" campaign to encourage Ohioans to choose active modes of transportation, and pass bicyclists safely when traveling by car. Soon Yay Bikes! will also announce the 5 agencies to benefit from this spring's How We Roll / Ride Buddy pilot program for state employees!

COTA launches their systemwide overhaul this month with FREE rides May 1–7. Too far to ride all the way to work? Ride to a bus stop, load your bike on the front rack (here's how!) and veg during the journey! 

The Mid Ohio Regional Planning Commission's 2016 Columbus Metro Bike Map is available online, and coming to a bike shop near you (courtesy Yay Bikes! special delivery) soon. 

Our original Bike Life 101 content provides lots of valuable information on how to use your bicycle for transportation. For more personalized support, Yay Bikes! is offering How We Roll rides FREE to our members—this month with an extra weekend time slot to accommodate every schedule!

If you are looking to make a change in your life, to finally begin exploring the joys of a life outside your car, let's get together and help you figure out how. Yes, you can!

'Healthy Earth' ride recap

Riding the Lane Ave bridge on a beautiful day. Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

Riding the Lane Ave bridge on a beautiful day. Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

Thanks to ride leader Rahel Babb for a fantastic experience and this write-up!

For April’s Year of Yay ride, we celebrated a Healthy Earth by joining our friends at FLOW (Friends of Lower Olentangy Watershed) to plant trees along the banks of the Olentangy River at the OSU Fawcett Center! It was a beautiful day spring day and everyone was excited to get on the road. For some, this was their first big ride of the year.

Ride leader Rahel Babb (in green) greets people as they arrive to Whole Foods Market. Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

Ride leader Rahel Babb (in green) greets people as they arrive to Whole Foods Market. Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

Because the FLOW event had already started by the time we departed, we took the most direct route to get there, which meant tackling 5 miles on Morse Road. Some riders were a little nervous about this part of the route, but our experienced leads and sweeps were there to make sure everyone felt comfortable and confident with the ride. 

A long ride down Morse Road is better with friends. Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

A long ride down Morse Road is better with friends. Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

We made it to the Fawcett Center ready to work. FLOW provided all of the tools: gloves, shovels, clippers, etc. Not realizing this, one of the riders brought his own shovel!

An extra shovel is never a bad thing! Photo credit: Rahel Babb

An extra shovel is never a bad thing! Photo credit: Rahel Babb

FLOW had a goal to plant 2,100 trees along an Olentangy River floodplain, and we were excited to help them meet that goal. However, because of a large volunteer turnout, by the time we got there, most of the trees had been planted. Instead of planting trees, we were tasked with removing honeysuckle (a very invasive shrub). Armed with saws and clippers, the group was led to an area overrun with the invasive plant. After a brief instruction on what to cut, the group got to work! It wasn’t long after we got going that a FLOW volunteer showed up with a bucket of tree saplings that had been overlooked, so some of us got to plant trees, too.

The crew clears invasive plants. Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

The crew clears invasive plants. Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

...a LOT of invasive plants! Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

...a LOT of invasive plants! Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

Snip, snip! Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

Snip, snip! Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

Not to be messed with! Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

Not to be messed with! Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

Unlike the ride to the site, our route back was much more leisurely and laid back. We meandered our way through North Linden over to Stelzer Road. After the ride, some of us gathered around the fire at Whole Foods and continued to enjoy each other’s company and the beautiful day. 

Mmmm...post-ride beverage, fire, friends! Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

Mmmm...post-ride beverage, fire, friends! Photo credit: Keith 'Lugs' Mayton

Thanks to everyone who rode with us this month! For more information on our ride partner and invasive species, check out Friends of Lower Olentangy Watershed (FLOW) and Ohio Invasive Plants. Cheers!

April 2017 activity report

Catherine leads a Professional Development Ride in Dover, OH for representatives from the city and ODOT District 11. Photo credit: Deo Martinez

Catherine leads a Professional Development Ride in Dover, OH for representatives from the city and ODOT District 11. Photo credit: Deo Martinez

Welcome to the monthly feature in which we round up all our events, earned media, program delivery, meetings and speaking engagements for the month. Representation and outreach like this is what you fund with your membership dollars and major gifts, folks! Behold, April:

All month

Delivered Columbus Bike Maps to bike shops throughout Central Ohio

April 3

Chaired the MORPC Community Advisory Committee meeting

April 5

Presented to 8th graders @ Columbus Gifted Academy

CDC.gov: Step It Up! Status Report for The Surgeon Generals Call to Action to Promote Walking and Walkable Communities (pdf, page 21, regarding the Ohio Active Transportation Plan, which Yay Bikes! helped develop)

April 6

Bike the Cbus planning meeting

April 7

cleveland.com: Summit Cycling's 'How We Roll' tours teach Akronites to ride bikes safely in the city

April 8

Year of Yay!, 'Healthy Earth' theme

April 10

Delivered a Professional Development Ride in New Philadelphia and in Dover

Pinchflat: Bike Poster Blowout planning meeting

April 11

Met with Connex, Portsmouth's bicycle advocacy group

Presented to the Westerville Bicycle Club

Presented to the Italian Village Society

April 13

Delivered a Professional Development Ride in New Albany

Part of the Ohio Active Transportation Team that received the Ohio TZD (Toward Zero Death) Award for Regional Collaboration at their Spring 2017 meeting

April 14

Ohio Action Institute planning meeting

April 15

Yay Valet! @ OSU Spring Game

April 16

Delivered 2 Professional Development Rides in Portsmouth

April 17

Attended the State Route 161 study Advisory Committee Meeting

April 20

Bike the Cbus planning meeting

Columbus Underground: Pinchflat: Bike Poster Blowout

April 22

Yay Valet! @ Earth Day

April 24

Delivered a Professional Development Ride in Racine

Met with the Director of the Athens County Library System about a bike rack purchase

April 25

Attended a Comfest Grant Committee meeting

April 27

Attended the Ohio Active Transportation quarterly team meeting

WOSU, All Sides with Ann Fisher: Ohio Bike Laws (rebroadcast)

April 30

Hosted a Yay Bikes! member appreciation event

Duane's Yay Bikes! Journey

Yay Bikes! Journeys recount how Yay Bikes! is transforming lives and communities, from the perspective of those we’ve impacted. In this installment, we hear from Yay Bikes! Board Member Duane McCoy about how Yay Bikes! has helped him feel safe riding the streets in his neighborhood, and given him a meaningful outlet for uplifting his community. 

No matter the weather, you'll find Duane among the crew parking bikes (Duane = hero in the blue coat). 

No matter the weather, you'll find Duane among the crew parking bikes (Duane = hero in the blue coat). 

I’m not the biggest bike guy you’ll ever meet, but I’m a big promoter of Yay Bikes! because I’ve seen for myself how our work has made my neighborhood a better place. Also, the people are great!
— Duane McCoy

A HAPPY ACCIDENT: "I didn't know a thing about Yay Bikes! when I signed up for a volunteer shift at the Comfest bike corral." 

Duane McCoy's passions are volunteerism and community. With a personal goal to devote at least 10 hours a month to giving back, he is always looking for new ways to help. And so, one year for Comfest, he randomly picked a gig that seemed fun: volunteering in their newfangled bike corral. He claims to have fallen in love immediately with Catherine (as in Girves, current Yay Bikes! Executive Director), who was running the show at that time. "She's awesome at cultivating followers," he said. Indeed, he's followed her for almost 9 years since...

Where it all began: the Comfest bike corral. 

Where it all began: the Comfest bike corral. 

Best buds Duane, Stinger and Catherine (Girves) at a Bike to Work Day event. Photo credit: Bryan Barr

Best buds Duane, Stinger and Catherine (Girves) at a Bike to Work Day event. Photo credit: Bryan Barr

ASSUMING LEADERSHIP: "I was really looking for a way to take my passion for volunteering and community to a new level."

Many shifts in the bike corral later, and Duane had graduated from the United Way of Central Ohio's Pride Leadership program, which prepares LGBT community members for board leadership. Catherine had recently assumed the role of Yay Bikes! Executive Director, and set to snatching him up before other organizations had a chance. Duane joined the Yay Bikes! board in May of 2014 and, though he won't quite admit it, has since become a powerful advocate for bicycling, both in Columbus and Grange Insurance, where he works in operations.

With former Columbus Mayor Michael "Bikin' Mike" Coleman, promoting bicycling alongside several Grange colleagues.

With former Columbus Mayor Michael "Bikin' Mike" Coleman, promoting bicycling alongside several Grange colleagues.

Riding with his colleagues to lunch on a Yay Bikes! Ride Buddy ride. 

Riding with his colleagues to lunch on a Yay Bikes! Ride Buddy ride. 

Duane (blue hoodie, left) and his husband, Mike, at the Columbus Ride of Silence.

Duane (blue hoodie, left) and his husband, Mike, at the Columbus Ride of Silence.

SAFER TRAVELS: "My neighbors love, love, LOVE the new bike lanes on Summit and Fourth Streets—as do Mike & I. We haven't had to use a trail to get around in ages!"

Duane still doesn't consider himself a big-time cyclist-type, but he appreciates how Yay Bikes!' education and advocacy efforts have improved his experience of traveling in his neighborhood. When he does ride, he feels far more peaceful than he used to—the new bike lanes near his house help him feel protected, motorists seem more aware of cyclists, bicyclists have become more predictable. There is much less chaos on the roads than there used to be, he says. "We have such a fun, vibrant, kind bicycle community here, and it's making a real difference for people—even people like myself, who aren't that hardcore. I feel fortunate that Yay Bikes! provides me so many opportunities to make my neighborhood, my workplace and my city even more fantastic than they already are."

Duane pores over a map of the proposed (now installed!) bicycle infrastructure on Summit & Fourth Streets, near his Italian Village home. 

Duane pores over a map of the proposed (now installed!) bicycle infrastructure on Summit & Fourth Streets, near his Italian Village home. 

Yay Bikes! is grateful to Duane for his spirit of giving, his integrity and his good humor. We appreciate his willingness to step up no matter the task—advocacy, bike parking, tabling events, board leadership and more—and bring his lovely husband, Mike, along for the ride. What a lucky 'twofer' for us! 

Helmets off to you, friends!


To share your Yay Bikes! Journey, contact Meredith to set up a chat!

March 2017 activity report

Deo & Meredith accepting an award from the Greater Ohio Policy Center, who nominated us for a Greater Ohio Sustainable Development Award in the Non-profit Luminary category. 

Deo & Meredith accepting an award from the Greater Ohio Policy Center, who nominated us for a Greater Ohio Sustainable Development Award in the Non-profit Luminary category. 

Welcome to the monthly feature in which we round up all our events, earned media, program delivery, meetings and speaking engagements for the month. Representation and outreach like this is what you fund with your membership dollars and major gifts, folks! Behold, March:

All month

Delivered Columbus Bike Maps to bike shops throughout Central Ohio

March 7

Ride of Silence planning meeting

March 8

Attended the Greater Ohio Policy Center's annual Award Ceremony, to accept a Greater Ohio Sustainable Development Award in the Non-profit Luminary category

March 9

Tabled @ the annual Battelle Bike Expo

March 11

Year of Yay! ride, Prohibition theme

March 14

Attended the State Route 161 study Advisory Committee Meeting

March 16

Bike the Cbus planning meeting

March 18

Tabled @ Cyclist Connection's 10th Annual Garage Sale/Swap Meet

March 19

Tabled @ the Ohio Bicycle Swap Meet

March 20

Yay Bikes! Board of Directors meeting

March 20–22

Delivered Commuter Ride Leader training to 8 people from cities throughout Ohio,
in Columbus

March 21

WBNS 10TV: Columbus city engineers using bikes to better survey roads

March 23

Spoke to Maria Conroy's City & Regional Planning class on Sustainable Development

March 24

MC'd the Columbus Green Spot Awards

March 27

 WOSU, All Sides with Ann Fisher: Ohio Bike Laws

March 28

Happiness on Two Wheels: How to Roll

March 29–31

Delivered Commuter Ride Leader training to 8 people from cities throughout Ohio,
in Fremont

Training trainers

A cohort of trainees from around the state learns to deliver critical info while leading a How We Roll ride, at our Columbus-based training. 

A cohort of trainees from around the state learns to deliver critical info while leading a How We Roll ride, at our Columbus-based training. 

In March, we trained 16 people from throughout Ohio—Dayton, Cleveland, Fremont, Marietta, Columbus, Waverly, Lima and Massillon—to deliver How We Roll and Ride Buddy rides to members of their communities. The 3-day trainings, which occurred in Columbus and Fremont, were funded by the Ohio Department of Health as part of their commitment to promoting active transportation in Ohio. An additional 9 people were trained in August of 2016 to lead commuter-oriented educational rides, the "Yay Way!". Participants were planners, advocates, public health professionals, engineers and more. All = total badass rock stars. 

A trainee practices leading a How We Roll ride through the University District.  

A trainee practices leading a How We Roll ride through the University District.  

With 3 commuter ride leader trainings in the span of 6 months, it's clear that Ohio has gotten real when it comes to promoting active transportation, and bicycling in particular. Having 25 people trained to lead educational rides throughout the state represents a massive surge in our capacity to transition people from driving motor vehicles to riding bicycles. More importantly, it represents a shift in the way our leadership is thinking about—and investing in—bicycle education. Gone are the days in which print materials were the beginning and end of our education campaigns! As Yay Bikes! has always insisted, bicycle education works when people teach people how to navigate traffic by bicycle. Now, we are proud to note that our expertise in this area is being employed to enact uniquely effective "mode shift" programming statewide. And we are very proud of the people who completed our extremely rigorous, mentally and physically challenging training, knowing they will be a great service to Ohio in the years to come. 

A cohort of trainees from around the state practices delivering critical info while leading a How We Roll ride, at our Fremont-based training. Photo credit: Nelson Shogren

A cohort of trainees from around the state practices delivering critical info while leading a How We Roll ride, at our Fremont-based training. Photo credit: Nelson Shogren

Remember, Yay Bikes! now offers members a FREE How We Roll ride—we are here to help you sharpen your road riding skills and ride more confidently than ever before. Check for upcoming rides and register today! Not a member? Join today! Not in Columbus? Hit us up and we'll put you in touch with one of our new ride leaders.
A vast and mighty army is at the ready, waiting for you to take the leap into your fabulous bike life. 3...2...1...JUMP! 

Gloria's Yay Bikes! journey

Yay Bikes! Journeys recount how Yay Bikes! is transforming lives and communities, from the perspective of those we’ve impacted. In this installment, we hear from Gloria Hendricks about how Yay Bikes! has profoundly affected her family's life. 

The Hendricks clan is a biking clan.

The Hendricks clan is a biking clan.

Our family has explored many places and had many adventures on our bikes, and what’s especially meaningful about that to me and Rob, as parents, has been connecting with our kids during those rides without screens occupying all their attention. We feel very lucky that Yay Bikes! was there to support us as we became a family that bikes—everywhere!
— Gloria Hendricks

FEELING AFRAID: "I said, 'You put my babies on THE ROAD...in snow and ice?!'"

On a wintery January morning in 2012, Gloria Hendricks went to work, and her husband, Rob, took their kids on a bike ride (in fact, the very first Year of Yay! ride ever!). On the road. In snow and ice. Rob called later, when they were home safe and sound, detailing their adventure. "So that was my first reality to Yay Bikes!. I’ll never forget that" she said, chuckling. The family was extremely new to bicycling at that point, with Rob just having taken it up after knee surgeries prevented him from running. But Gloria didn't yet own a bike, and she hadn't ridden since she was a kid. And she was very, very clear that she didn't want to start up again now—especially with her boys being out there on the road.

Gloria's youngest on his first Year of Yay! ride (Jan 2012). 

Gloria's youngest on his first Year of Yay! ride (Jan 2012). 

Gloria's oldest (lower left) rode his own bike on super slushly streets during his first Year of Yay! ride.

Gloria's oldest (lower left) rode his own bike on super slushly streets during his first Year of Yay! ride.

JOINING THE GANG: "Mom, I think you'll really like it!"

For Valentine's Day that year, Rob bought Gloria a bicycle, and she took her first ride since earning a driver's license in high school. But the bike was a tank and not so much fun, so they traded it for a new one that was lighter and faster. Which was super, except that she was left without an excuse to beg off rides! With her boys badgering her and Rob pressuring her to join the family during her limited time off work, she agreed to attend her first Year of Yay! ride in March of 2012. As she rode on the road, she remembers thinking "Oh, this is not right!" and being scared out of her mind. But she bravely returned for April's ride...during which her oldest fell and injured his arm while he was riding far in front of her. As she caught up to him, she saw several fellow riders around him and felt...calm; he was safe, because everyone had his back. Regardless of where they fell in the pack, she realized, they were never alone. 

Gloria joined a Year of Yay! ride in March, two months after the rest of her family. 

Gloria joined a Year of Yay! ride in March, two months after the rest of her family. 

Obviously, she got the hang of it!

Obviously, she got the hang of it!

FACING TRAGEDY: "I didn't really start to enjoy riding until Rob's accident—is that weird?"

In October of 2012, a driver who was texting at the time rear-ended Rob as he was riding to work. He very nearly died (saved by his helmet and sheer luck!), but he was especially sad not to have made his goal of riding 4,000 miles that year. So Gloria got to thinking—what can I do for him? "I took over riding," she said. "I took over riding for him so he could make his 4,000 miles. That's what started it. It made me more independent to ride on the road by myself, it made realize I could do things." People thought she might quit riding after the crash—and she did too—but she just couldn't let fear dominate their lives, or have her kids see them giving up. Everything has risk, she figured, and this was one worth taking. Her family's bicycle adventures had become more than just rides. Yay Bikes! was introducing them to fascinating parts of Columbus, plus surrounding her kids with good role models and developing their characters through conversation and volunteerism. It was too good a thing to let go of. 

The car that rear-ended her husband. 

The car that rear-ended her husband. 

Gloria's boys visit their dad in the hospital on Halloween, just a couple of weeks after his crash. 

Gloria's boys visit their dad in the hospital on Halloween, just a couple of weeks after his crash. 

GOING ALL IN: "Biking is very peaceful; it shuts your mind down in certain ways. It makes you think about what's important to you."

Five years into her now-lifelong bicycling adventure, Gloria isn't necessarily proud of how many bikes she has, but hey! They each do different things! Gloria is a commuter cyclist, goes mountain biking, races (slowly, but it counts!), vacations and camps by bike and does a 100-mile ride on each anniversary of Rob's accident. She is officially all in! Gloria credits Yay Bikes! with helping her gain independence and self confidence, and connecting her with people who have become like family to her, both on the bike and off.

Gloria on her 100-mile ride, to commemorate the 1-year anniversary of Rob's crash.

Gloria on her 100-mile ride, to commemorate the 1-year anniversary of Rob's crash.

Gloria and Rob, riding together, forever. <3

Gloria and Rob, riding together, forever. <3

Yay Bikes! is grateful to Gloria for her spunk, her sense of humor, her perseverance and her extreme dedication to family. We appreciate the hours she has devoted to volunteering with us, and all the joy and hardship she has shared with us over the years. 

Helmets off to you, friend!


To share your Yay Bikes! Journey, contact Meredith to set up a chat!

'Prohibition' ride recap

Thanks to ride leader David Curran for a fantastic experience and this write-up!

The Prohibition-themed Year of Yay! ride on March 11 started out on a sunny, brisk 23-degree morning from Whole Foods. 

Hi there! Photo credit: Deo Martinez

Hi there! Photo credit: Deo Martinez

The 20-or so riders braved the cold all the way up the Alum Creek Trail to downtown Westerville to visit the main library and the Anti-Salon League Museum contained within. Nina Thomas of the museum gave us an introduction to it, and a great history lesson about Westerville's place in the Prohibition era.

Nina Thomas, welcoming and educating our group. 

Nina Thomas, welcoming and educating our group. 

Next, on a quick tour into downtown Westerville, we saw a couple of locations of significant events that heralded the beginning and the end of the city's long prohibition of alcohol. We saw where it all ended in 2006, at Michael's Pizza (now closed). We then saw where the original Corbin's Tavern stood, which was bombed by angry Temperance supporters at the beginning of Westerville's Whiskey Wars in the late 1800s.

Michael's Pizza, celebrating the end of Westerville's long dry spell in 2006.

Michael's Pizza, celebrating the end of Westerville's long dry spell in 2006.

Corbin's Tavern, upon being bombed by Temperance supporters. 

Corbin's Tavern, upon being bombed by Temperance supporters. 

We then returned south via the Alum Creek Trail and a quick spin through Easton Town Center. Since we all had our cold-weather gear already on, we relaxed afterwards around the outdoor fire pit at Whole Foods and celebrated with legal and well-deserved libations of choice.

Socializin'. As we do. Photo credit: David Curran

Socializin'. As we do. Photo credit: David Curran

Total mileage for the ride was about 17-miles. A big thank you to everyone who helped make the ride possible.

Getting to Know Mr Deo

Deo Martinez, Yay Bikes! Program Manager

Deo Martinez, Yay Bikes! Program Manager

Recently, Yay Bikes! hired a new Program Manager—one Mr Deo Martinez. This is the guy you'll be volunteering with to support all the awesome Yay Bikes! programming, so we thought you'd wanna know a bit about him. Here goes:

Hometown

Saginaw, Michigan

College & major

Columbus College of Art & Design, Illustration

Former jobs & employers

Slinging food here and there

What's your everyday ride? 

Fuji Track 2016:

When and why did you start riding your bicycle for transportation?

I've been into bikes for a long time, I rode my BMX bike for transportation  and recreation for years. I ended up getting injured doing it and decided to give it up. I sold my BMX and bought Road bike, thus a real bike commuter was born.

What was your most spectacular crash?

I once fell over it front of a sorority party, because my feet were stuck in foot retention.

Fave ride fuel (aka food)?

Anything Seafood! Shrimp, Squid, scallops, mussels! Pass it all my way.

What's the biggest reason you're excited to work for Yay Bikes!?

I'm happy to be part of something that's much bigger than I am. I'm lucky to be in a position to help move this city forward with bicycle commuting and safer transportation.

What most stellar qualities / skills / attitudes / superpowers do you bring to your work with Yay Bikes!?

I believe that I bring a bit to the table in terms of skill and qualities; a different perspective towards bike culture, tallness, art. My attitude is calm, kind and determined. Working under pressure doesn't bother me at all. As for super powers, there might be a rumor out there that I can dance, but who knows?

Why will people definitely want to volunteer this year with Yay Bikes!?

Psh, because I'll be there! I want to know all about your lives while wemake our community a better place forCyclists. Come have fun with me!

Anything else fun we should know?

I have 2 dogs named Alice and Vivan.

I'm a Nerd.

I like to Dance.

I enjoy cooking.


Yay Bikes! is excited to welcome Deo into the fold. So far, so good! We're pretty sure you'll wanna know this guy! ;)

It's your year!

Happiness is volunteering with friends.

Happiness is volunteering with friends.

I’ll be the first to admit that it’s not always been easy to plug into the work of Yay Bikes!. With a small staff, it’s been challenging for us to adequately support everyone who wants to be involved. This year, however, we’re ready. We have a new plan, a new person and plenty of opportunities for you to apply your passion to what we're up to. I encourage you to explore, reach out, stick your toe in or your neck out, get trained, take ownership, step into greatness, have fun, settle into a community, make a difference. Yay Bikes! is all that for you, and more. Below are some ways to learn how to plug into all that awesome.

THE PLAN

Read our 2017 Strategic Plan to find out where we're headed, and how you might help advance our goals this year.

THE PERSON

Meet Deo, our new Program Manager

Meet Deo, our new Program Manager

Reach out to Deo (deo@yaybikes.com) for a chat. Deo will be largely taking over the role I've been playing in delivering our programs and coordinating volunteers. And he's lovely, folks! He will take good care of you. When you feel ready to step into volunteering with Yay Bikes!, Deo is your man.

THE OPPORTUNITIES

Stay attuned to the opportunities posted on our Volunteering page; more will be added all the time as our season unfolds (there are often others as well, which may not get posted—again, contact Deo to learn more). If biking is your passion and you want to serve through Yay Bikes!, pick up some shifts parking bikes or tabling or making Year of Yay! buttons. As you model our values doing the small tasks, we just may tap you to get trained for volunteer leadership positions. There is always the chance for growth in our organization. 

 

 

Nick's Yay Bikes! journey

Yay Bikes! Journeys recount how Yay Bikes! is transforming lives and communities, from the perspective of those we’ve impacted. In this installment, we hear from Nick Tepe, Director of Athens County Public Libraries, about how Yay Bikes! has enriched his life and made his community of Nelsonville more bicycle friendly. 

Nick rides Ohio

Nick rides Ohio

We’ve really been able to move the needle on cycling awareness in not just Franklin County anymore, but the entire state. The people who are making decisions about how we can be safe and have fun riding our bikes on the road are actually paying attention to us now, and it is 100% because of this organization. Which is why I am proud to continue to support Yay Bikes!, even though I no longer live in Columbus.
— Nick Tepe

RIDING SOLO: “That’s just what I do, I ride my bike to where I want to go.”

Nick has, for as long as he can remember, ridden his bike to get where he wants to go. Thanks to the gift of 70s-era parents, he even rode his bike several miles to get to his elementary school! So it was a no brainer that he took his bike to college in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and then grad school at OSU. And when he got his first library job at the Columbus Metropolitan Library, of course he’d ride his bike to work. “For me,” he says, it was no big deal—that’s just what I do, I ride my bike to where I want to go.”

Nick, on one of his early big boy bikes. 

Nick, on one of his early big boy bikes. 

FINDING COMMUNITY: “This is great! Yay Bikes! is connecting me to a whole new network of friends and activity.”

The first contact Nick had with Yay Bikes! was the Bike to Work Challenge in 2009. And what struck him about it most was the approach of getting people not just to ride their bikes to work, but also to have fun doing it. Nick’s CML team did have fun—so much so that they ended up winning their category that year and growing their team each year thereafter. Then, when Yay Bikes! announced the Year of Yay! rides in 2012, Nick had just gotten divorced and was looking for ways to get himself out there, keep active, meet new people and take his mind off what he was going through. So he came out for the St. Patty’s Day Parade ride (Year of Yay! 12.3, March 2012), had such a blast that he decided he was going to do the rest of them, which he did. About which he remembers thinking, “This is great! Yay Bikes! is connecting me to a whole new network of friends and activity, and the organization is doing a lot of good, too.”

The first known photo of Nick in his new Yay Bikes! milieu, during a post-ride trip to Hal & Al's in March  2012. 

The first known photo of Nick in his new Yay Bikes! milieu, during a post-ride trip to Hal & Al's in March  2012. 

Rockin' the Year of Yay! 2012 button series.

Rockin' the Year of Yay! 2012 button series.

Ringing the bells of Trinity Episcopal on the Year of Yay! ride he led to various places of worship. 

Ringing the bells of Trinity Episcopal on the Year of Yay! ride he led to various places of worship. 

SEEING RESULTS: “I think [Yay Bikes! Executive Director] Catherine Girves is a bike infrastructure fairy. She visits a town and magically bike infrastructure appears.”

Nick was driving to work shortly after Yay Bikes! led his Nelsonville’s City Manager and a City Council Member on a Professional Development Ride and saw, to his great surprise, sharrows on the road leading from the bike path to the Nelsonville Public Library. He notes with excitement that it’s been great for his patrons, who can now rent a bike for free from the library’s established “Book a Bike” program and use sharrows to make their way safely to the trail for a ride. And he credits “The Yay Way!” with making the difference: “I don’t think that Yay Bikes! would have been as successful as we’ve been with advocacy if we hadn’t done that initial front-end work of making bicycling a fun activity for people, making it something that anybody can do, by making people feel comfortable, by hosting rides that have both more and less experienced riders, on and on and on.“ 

Downtown Nelsonville received sharrows just days after Yay Bikes! led a Professional Development Ride there

Downtown Nelsonville received sharrows just days after Yay Bikes! led a Professional Development Ride there

FEELING PRIDE: “I have just been more and more blown away by everything that we’re pulling off with this group.”

“It’s a credit to Yay Bikes! that people around the state have become aware of the work Yay Bikes! is doing and are reaching out to us as experts on how to improve cycling for everybody in their communities. We’ve really been able to move the needle on cycling awareness in not just Franklin County anymore, but the entire state. The people who are making decisions about how we can be safe and have fun riding our bikes on the road, are actually paying attention to us now, and it is 100% because of this organization. Which is why I am proud to continue to support Yay Bikes!, even though I no longer live in Columbus!”

Party on, Nick! 

Party on, Nick! 

Yay Bikes! is grateful to Nick for his joyful presence, his deep knowledge of all things bike (and every other topic under the sun—yay librarians!) and the innumerable ways he has helped his friends, colleagues and community members achieve happiness and health through bicycling. We look forward to riding with him again soon on a Year of Yay!, when baby Piper is finally ready to rock that trailer. Helmets off to you, friend!


To share your Yay Bikes! Journey, contact Meredith to set up a chat!

February 2017 activity report

Yay Bikes! member Rob Hendricks (by the door) represents on behalf of people who ride bicycles for transportation at the Linden-area Smart Columbus Community Planning Meeting. Photo credit: MurphyEpson

Yay Bikes! member Rob Hendricks (by the door) represents on behalf of people who ride bicycles for transportation at the Linden-area Smart Columbus Community Planning Meeting. Photo credit: MurphyEpson

Welcome to the monthly feature in which we round up all our events, earned media, program delivery, meetings and speaking engagements for the month. Representation and outreach like this is what you fund with your membership dollars and major gifts, folks! Behold, February:

Feb 2

Bike the Cbus planning meeting

Feb 4

Year of Yay! vetting ride

Feb 8

BG Independent News: BG completes first ‘Complete Streets’ efforts

Columbus Chamber of Commerce Annual Meeting

Meeting with the General Property Manager of the Huntington Center about indoor bicycle parking for employees

Feb 9

Columbus Green Team meeting

Feb 10

COTA NextGen project advisory stakeholder meeting

Smart Columbus Community Planning Meeting in Linden

Feb 11

Smart Columbus Community Planning Meeting in Linden

Feb 14

Meeting at Ohio Department of Health about the upcoming train the trainer program

Feb 15

Meeting with Mark Wagenbrenner about Wagenbrenner Development's sponsorship of Bike the Cbus

CoGo Bike Share quarterly stakeholder meeting

Feb 16

Bike the Cbus planning meeting

Ohio Active Transportation Plan team leader meeting

Meeting with Sideswipe Brewing about hosting a membership event

Feb 20

Yay Bikes! Board of Directors meeting

Feb 22

City of Dublin Mobility Study stakeholder workshop

Feb 24

How We Roll ride for members

Ride of Silence fundraiser @ Cafe Brioso

Feb 27

Mid Ohio Regional Planning Commission Community Advisory Council meeting, which is chaired by our Executive Director

Battle ready

Emotions are running high these days.

Amidst all the chaos, I’ve been tempted to wonder—where does bicycle advocacy belong? I ride my bike as transportation almost every day, so I’ve had the time and space to thoroughly consider this point. And I tell you—people who ride, bicycle advocacy has everything to do with building the Beloved Community we all need.

People who ride, advocating for ethical engineering

What was the most photographed slide by the sold-out crowd of engineers and other transportation professionals atODOT's Active Transportation Engineer’s Forum earlier this week? Remarkably, the one reading:

Vision Zero takes the position that it is unethical to create a situation where fatalities are a likely outcome of a crash in order to reduce delay, fuel consumption, or other societal objectives. It is unethical to prioritize the mobility of one person over the safety of another person.

The goal of transportation engineers is shifting dramatically, from an emphasis of moving cars to an emphasis of moving people. The future is ours, but we have to show up to claim it. As with any change, many may be on board, but some are not. Federal guidelines for bike and pedestrian infrastructure still do not adequately support engineers ready to implement it. And leadership change begets priorities change. We must continue demanding accommodations for those who ride, or inertia will stall our progress and engineers’ best intentions to facilitate it.

People who ride, advocating for sanity

As a seasoned activist, I am cheered to note that most of the survival guides out there highlight self care as a critical element of our effectiveness. To settle in for the long haul, we must make time to unplug, be silent, recharge. I’ve noticed when I ride to my destination I am able to recharge en route and arrive fresh and clear-headed. When I ride with friends, my faith in humanity is restored. Bicycling beats burnout.

People who ride, advocating for transportation options & intersectionality

All people deserve to have viable transportation options that allow us to successfully navigate our lives. And while many of us have the choice to ride or drive, others among us do not. During the 10 years in which I first became a transportation bicyclist it was out of economic necessity. When conversations about affordable housing, safety, education, sustainability, economic development and equity omit transportation, it's a missed opportunity. It's on us to communicate to potential partners how bicycling is a solution to many of the concerns we share.

People who ride, advocating for an expanded notion of safe streets

"It's Trump time, nigger!” A man yelled this out a truck window to a friend of mine as he was riding his bicycle to work. "Mooooo!" A group of men called out to another friend as her large body pedaled down the street. Yes—in Columbus. Our movement, which has focused on achieving infrastructure that promotes safety, needs to become more attuned to the culture in which people have to ride. Let us now understand that not everyone who rides has the same experience of their ride, regardless of the infrastructure available—some of us, due to our sex, body shape or skin color, assume more risk than others. Our community must rally around to forcefully denounce these threats. 

People who ride, banding together

It’s time to advocate. Are you battle ready? I am. Let's join together.

January 2017 activity report

Executive Director Catherine Girves joins staff and lay leaders at Summit on 16th United Methodst Church in celebration of Martin Luther King Jr's birthday at the Greater Columbus Convention Center.

Executive Director Catherine Girves joins staff and lay leaders at Summit on 16th United Methodst Church in celebration of Martin Luther King Jr's birthday at the Greater Columbus Convention Center.

Welcome to the monthly feature in which we round up all our events, earned media, program delivery, meetings and speaking engagements for the month. Representation and outreach like this is what you fund with your membership dollars and major gifts, folks! Behold, January:

Jan 3

Meeting with Elevator Brewery about Ride the Elevator and Bike the Cbus

Jan 4

Meeting with Whole Foods Easton about 2017's Year of Yay! 

Regular meeting of MidOhio Regional Planning Commission's Citizen Advisory Council, which our Executive Director chairs

Jan 5

Meeting with Columbus City Schools regarding installation of new bike racks

Bike the Cbus planning meeting

Jan 9

Signage meeting of the Central Ohio Greenways Board

Jan 11

Team meeting at MurphyEpson regarding statewide Ohio Active Transportation Plan spring trainings

Jan 12

Conference call for Creating Healthy Communities about statewide trainings

Advisory Committee meeting for SR 161 Corridor Study

Ride of Silence planning meeting

Jan 13

Meeting at Ohio Department of Health to plan for the Ohio Active Transportation Action Institute Conference in June

Jan 14

Year of Yay! ride (cancelled)

Jan 16

Columbus' Martin Luther King Jr breakfast celebration, with leadership from Summit on 16th UMC, University Area Enrichment Association and University Area Freedom School

Yay Bikes! Board of Directors meeting

Jan 19

Meeting with leadership team of the Ohio Active Transportation Plan 

Bike the Cbus planning meeting

Jan 24

Meeting with Ohio Department of Health and Center for Disease Control officials about Ohio's Active Transportation Plan

Jan 25

Regular meeting of the Central Ohio Greenways Board; presented on Miamisburg's Bike Friendly Business program

Jan 26

Ride of Silence planning meeting

Jan 27

Ohio Active Transportation Plan quarterly webinar; presented on our Ride Buddy program and Ohio's new 3' safe passing law

Jan 28

Attended Transit Columbus' board retreat as an invited guest

Jan 30

Canal Winchester City Council meeting; presenting with Kerstin Carr of the MidOhio Regional Planning Commission on the work of the Central Ohio Greenways Board

Jan 31

Attended the Active Transportation Engineering Conference in Columbus

Tracking (is) what matters

That fateful day, thanks to Deanne (front), a goal was born!

That fateful day, thanks to Deanne (front), a goal was born!

'From the Saddle' is a monthly note from our Executive Director. 

On New Year’s Day 2016, I happened to be riding with a group of friends. We had ridden about 14 miles when my friend Deanne said we should ride 16, for 2016. It was cold and we wanted to be done, but we were so close, and it was such a good idea, that we pushed through and did it. There is something about setting a goal that helps a person make a plan, and then move towards achieving it—particularly in those moments when it is not very much fun. So that day I set a goal: I’d ride 100% of the days in 2016, even if only for very short trips, for a total of 2016 miles. Which changed everything about how I thought about bicycling. 

One year later I can report the following: 255 days of biking (70%), for a total of 2,477 miles. Pretty kickass, no?!

I’m not gonna lie. There were days after I realized I wouldn’t make it to 100% in which I chose not to ride, all pouty-like. That’s a danger with setting big goals—when it seems you’ll not be able to attain them, it’s easy to say “f it” and quit. But because I’d been tracking, I noticed something. Maybe I wasn’t going to be able to 100% of days, but 70% was absolutely within reach…and still pretty kickass! Hmmm….so I got back on my bike and rode some more. 

What gets measured gets done, as they say. Clichéd? OK sure. Still true? Yes!

I’m not hardcore. People seem to think I am, but I swear to you that I’m simply utilitarian (OK, and competitive….) I find life is easier when I choose to ride. It’s cheaper, of course, and also I don’t have to deal with parking. And I feel better about myself and the world around me. But I’m slow and my trips are often quite short. My point is that anyone can do what I’ve done—set a goal to ride a certain number of days or trips or miles, do it and then track it. The tracking is non-negotiable. Those of us who are up to something big must have a way to stay motivated, keep ourselves accountable, and cheer ourselves when we feel like a failure. We've almost always done more than we think we have, and knowing that can propel us to carry on.

Not coincidentally, given the time of year, we’re in the midst of setting 2017’s organizational goals at Yay Bikes!. For a small nonprofit, I’m proud to say that we are uniquely oriented toward evaluation. As we develop our measurable objectives and tracking protocols this year, we are motivated to identify the metrics that truly help us achieve the big goals that advance our mission. Not tracking for tracking’s sake, but tracking that provides access to excellence and transformation. From my own experience, I can tell you that this will get the job done. I'll be very excited to share our strategic plan with you as soon as it’s approved at our board meeting this month. In the meantime, you can check out our 2016 Annual Report (pdf) to see what we've accomplished recently!

For the record, what am I shooting for this year? I plan to ride 75% of days, and add more recreational miles to my total. Mileage isn’t so important to me because I’m about replacing car trips with bike trips, and those trips tend to be five miles or less. But whatever type of ride I’m on, you better believe I’ll be keeping track. Join me? Year of Yay! and Bike the Cbus do count, you know! :)

Riding with friends is the best way to ride. See you soon??

Riding with friends is the best way to ride. See you soon??

December 2016 activity report

Our Executive Director, Catherine (right), with Kimber Perfect of Mayor Ginther's office at the hearing for HB 154, Ohio's 3' safe passing law.

Our Executive Director, Catherine (right), with Kimber Perfect of Mayor Ginther's office at the hearing for HB 154, Ohio's 3' safe passing law.

Welcome to the monthly feature in which we round up all our events, earned media, program delivery, meetings and speaking engagements for the month. Representation and outreach like this is what you fund with your membership dollars and major gifts, folks! Behold, December:

Dec 1

Columbus CEO: SIDs' Annual Meeting (pdf)

Dec 2

Statewide Mode Shift Project ("Your Move, Ohio") Meeting

Dec 3

Year of Yay! vetting ride

Dec 6

Attended hearing for HB154, Ohio's 3' passing law

Dec 7

(Bowling Green) Sentinel-Tribune: Complete Streets process to remain in place with closer eye on deadlines

Dec 10

Year of Yay! with 'Heartwarming' theme

Dec 14

Meeting with owner of Orbit City bike shop

Dec 16

(Bowling Green) Sentinel-Tribune: BG makes plans to align city budget

Dec 18

Received 7 bike racks for Columbus Public Health

Dec 19

COTA Project Advisory Group

Yay Bikes! board meeting

Govenor Kasich signs HB154, defining safe passing of cyclists in Ohio's as 3', into law; takes effect March 19

Dec 24

Meeting with founders of Steady Pedaling